Fake News Controversy and Flaws of American Journalism: Foreign Journalists and Public Relations Professionals Talk Live with My Students via Skype and Facebook Video

In this past semester, 10 current and former journalists and public relations professionals from foreign countries came to my BC&J353 (International Communication and Foreign Press) class as guest speakers.

They talked live from their homes in Spain, Germany, Romania, Denmark, UK, Ireland, Canada and Russia via Skype or Facebook Video. Two were unable to talk live with my students due to logistical reasons but they provided very detailed answers via email to questions raised by my students.

The International Communication course aims to enhance broadcasting and journalism students’ understanding of the mass media environment around the world. The course exposes students to mass media operations under various theories of the press. This class is vital to future success of my students, given that we are at a time when America is so involved in global affairs but American citizens including many of its journalists know so little about the rest of the world.

Most of my students have never been abroad. The professional experience, anecdotes and insight these foreign guest speakers shared in class were truly eye opening. For example, students said that Continue reading

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Western Illinois University And Pulitzer Legacy

Small is beautiful.

It may not always be true, but it is truer here than anywhere else in the world.

Four Pulitzer Prizes and five Emmy Awards are associated with Western Illinois University (WIU) Department of Broadcasting and Journalism. A Chicago Sun-Times reporter received the Pulitzer Prize for Continue reading

After Shadowing A Job for A Day, You Realize that Life Is Not What You Thought It Would Be

Participatory stories have a long history in American journalism. Nellie Bly faked insanity and became a patient in a mental institution in order to study the horrible conditions there. Corey Levitan put this investigative journalism to a new level in his journalistic career. He has shadowed hundreds of people for jobs he is “entirely unprepared to handle and then wrote about his experiences.”

In my JOUR330 (Newspaper and Magazine Feature Writing) class for spring 2017, I asked students to shadow any of the following jobs:

  1. Bartender
  2. Sewer worker
  3. Road cleanup crew
  4. Plumber
  5. Auctioneer
  6. A restaurant waiter/waitress
  7. A retail cashier
  8. Mailman
  9. Gravedigger
  10. Truck driver
  11. Basketball player
  12. Mayor
  13. Professor
  14. WIU president
  15. Police officer
  16. Prison guard
  17. Firefighter
  18. Farmer
  19. Doctor
  20. Homemaker
  21. Beggar
  22. Homeless person
  23. Janitor
  24. Secretary
  25. Auto mechanic
  26. Waste Management employee for curbside trash pickup
  27. Real estate agent
  28. Employee for tree trimming and removal service
  29. Football/basketball coach

Continue reading

A Superstar on the Rise: William Turkington (3)

William Turkington was a student of my JOUR330 (Newspaper and Magazine Feature Writing) class for spring 2017 semester. In this class, every student must report and write one query letter and more than 10 feature stories in different genres. Each story must not exceed 500 words. Then the student must expand whatever story of their choice into a polished, ready-for-publication long-form magazine article of 1,200 to 1,500 words.

image1_jour330

Students from my feature writing class pose in front of the department Wall of Fame. William Turkington stands in the back row, second from left. Photo credit: Provided by Yong Tang

Turkington came to my attention because  Continue reading

A Superstar on the Rise: William Turkington (2)

William Turkington was a student of my JOUR330 (Newspaper and Magazine Feature Writing) class for spring 2017 semester. In this class, every student must report and write one query letter and more than 10 feature stories in different genres. Each story must not exceed 500 words. Then the student must expand whatever story of their choice into a polished, ready-for-publication long-form magazine article of 1,200 to 1,500 words.

image1_jour330

Students from my feature writing class pose in front of the department Wall of Fame. William Turkington stands in the back row, second from left. Photo credit: Provided by Yong Tang

Turkington came to my attention because  Continue reading

A Superstar on the Rise: William Turkington (1)

William Turkington was a student of my JOUR330 (Newspaper and Magazine Feature Writing) class for spring 2017 semester. In this class, every student must report and write one query letter and more than 10 feature stories in different genres. Each story must not exceed 500 words. Then the student must expand whatever story of their choice into a polished, ready-for-publication long-form magazine article of 1,200 to 1,500 words.

image1_jour330

Students from my feature writing class pose in front of the department Wall of Fame. William Turkington stands in the back row, second from left. Photo credit: Provided by Yong Tang

Turkington came to my attention because  Continue reading

The New York Times Growth in digital subscribers

News from Midwest

The first number is 308,000 which is the net new digital subscribers according to CNN.

Circulation revenue is growing fast. But print ad revenue, the old backbone of the company, is declining fast. That leads to the second number: 17.9 percent.

The Times noted that digital ad revenue increased by 18.9 percent — but print is still more lucrative for the Times and other major papers.

The company’s overall earnings were 11 cents per share in the quarter, up a penny from the same quarter last year.

The current number of digital-only subscriptions is 2.2 million.

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Critique of Social Media Policy

Source: Critique of Social Media Policy

以为“高冷如冰山”,其实 “俏皮如孩童”

以为“高冷如冰山”

其实 “俏皮如孩童”

《唐勇看美国》读后感

一位15岁的北京女孩,年级学霸,舞蹈尖子,一直渴望出国去看看。她心中的圣地是位于纽约的茱莉亚音乐学院。刚刚过去的这个寒假,她读完了我的新闻作品报道集《唐勇看美国》,并写下好长的一篇读后感。文笔虽显稚嫩,但不乏真诚。她在读后感中说:“世界之大,值得我用欣赏的目光去看待。” Continue reading

Each Student Gets a Chinese Name: A Spring 2017 Souvenir

Like before, each student in my Spring 2017 classes gets a Chinese name as a souvenir. Students must be able to write and read their Chinese names to earn some extra credit. I encourage students to use their Chinese names whenever they can. Students enjoy this activity. Some posted their Chinese names on Facebook. Some even turned their lovely Chinese names into beautiful tattoos. Continue reading